Meg Myers: Tiny Desk Concert Myers replaces her album's roaring electric guitars and electronics with a pulsing string quartet, piano and brushed drums — and uncorks a cover of Kate Bush's "Running Up That Hill."

Tiny Desk

Meg Myers

Meg Myers put out one of 2018's most intense and cathartic albums. Take Me to the Disco raged and threw sonic punches at anyone who'd ever attempted to use or abuse her, from former record executives to past lovers. Dressed in a sparkling blue leotard, Myers re-creates that fire and ferocity behind the Tiny Desk, replacing her album's roaring electric guitars and electronics with a pulsing string quartet, piano and brushed drums.

But the most intense part of the performance is Myers herself. The distant, piercing looks she gives during the set's opening cut, "Jealous Sea," are unforgettable and unforgiving as she sings about a rat's nest of feelings — anger, fear, jealousy, desire — over an ex. "Everything's right, everything's wrong / When you call my name," she sings while half-hugging herself. "And I don't think I can stop the jealousy / When it comes, it comes like waves and I can't breathe."

Myers follows with a searing version of what she calls "a very lovely, uplifting song" from Take Me to the Disco called "Tear Me to Pieces," a frenzied takedown of liars, buried secrets and "wicked temptations." She then dials back the fury and indignation to close with a surprising version of "Running Up That Hill" by Kate Bush. Myers is a longtime fan, and often gets compared to the British singer. But Myers tells the audience she fell in love with the song for its meaning. "It's about men and women and the differences between them, and learning to have empathy for each other."

At the end of it all, standing behind the desk, Myers seems to finally exhale and let go of the fury as she paws playfully at her band, grateful to have gotten through it together.

Set List

  • "Jealous Sea"

  • "Tear Me to Pieces"

  • "Running Up That Hill"

Musicians

Meg Myers: bass, vocals; Jared Shavelson: drums, percussion; Josh Rheault: keys; Kristin Bakkegard: violin; Livy Amoruso: violin; Paul Bagley: viola; Carol Anne Bosco: cello

Credits

Producers: Robin Hilton, Morgan Noelle Smith; Creative Director: Bob Boilen; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Morgan Noelle Smith, Kaylee Domzalski, Kara Frame, Maia Stern; Editor: Kaylee Domzalski; Photo: Cameron Pollack/NPR

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