Husband And Wife Comment On 'New York Times' Facebook Article Stu Watson wrote he killed his Facebook account and doesn't miss it. His wife Kathy writes that he still benefits from the platform because she relays news from her account to him.
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Husband And Wife Comment On 'New York Times' Facebook Article

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Husband And Wife Comment On 'New York Times' Facebook Article

Husband And Wife Comment On 'New York Times' Facebook Article

Husband And Wife Comment On 'New York Times' Facebook Article

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Stu Watson wrote he killed his Facebook account and doesn't miss it. His wife Kathy writes that he still benefits from the platform because she relays news from her account to him.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Kathy and Stu Watson each had comments to add to a New York Times article about Facebook. It started with Stu. He wrote that he killed his account and has never missed it. Well, his wife, Kathy, wrote her own comment saying the updates her husband gets about friends having babies and so forth come from her Facebook. So she wrote, you are still benefiting from the platform, my dear, even if you want to be high and mighty about boycotting it. Ouch, Stu. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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