737 MAXs Grounded, When Facebook Is Down, College Admissions Scandal After a second fatal crash involving the Boeing 737 MAX airplane, countries around the world grounded the jet this week. Facebook and its suite of apps went offline for some time this week, leaving some social media users feeling disconnected. Plus, what one Ivy League-school graduate of color has to say about the college admissions scandal unveiled by the FBI. Julia Furlan is filling in for Sam this week, and she's joined by SELF editor Sally Tamarkin and WNYC reporter Arun Venugopal.
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Weekly Wrap: 737 MAXs Grounded, #FacebookDown, Photoshopped College 'Athletes'

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Weekly Wrap: 737 MAXs Grounded, #FacebookDown, Photoshopped College 'Athletes'

Weekly Wrap: 737 MAXs Grounded, #FacebookDown, Photoshopped College 'Athletes'

Weekly Wrap: 737 MAXs Grounded, #FacebookDown, Photoshopped College 'Athletes'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703844104/703889968" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A French investigation into the March 10 Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 MAX crash that killed 157 passengers and crew opened on March 15. TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images

A French investigation into the March 10 Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 MAX crash that killed 157 passengers and crew opened on March 15.

TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images

After a second fatal crash involving the Boeing 737 MAX airplane, countries around the world grounded the jet this week. Facebook and its suite of apps went offline for some time this week, leaving some social media users feeling disconnected. Plus, what one Ivy League-school graduate of color has to say about the college admissions scandal unveiled by the FBI. Julia Furlan is filling in for Sam this week, and she's joined by SELF editor Sally Tamarkin and WNYC reporter Arun Venugopal.