What Will Stop The Spread Of Online Extremism? : 1A The massacre in New Zealand tells us a lot about online extremism — the role tech companies play in regulating or banning fringe users, and the role each of us plays in creating the online ecosystem where hate can thrive.

How do we reckon with online hate? What consequences should there be for the bigots who promote acts of violence?

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What Will Stop The Spread Of Online Extremism?

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What Will Stop The Spread Of Online Extremism?

1A

What Will Stop The Spread Of Online Extremism?

What Will Stop The Spread Of Online Extremism?

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CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND - MARCH 15: A floral tribute is seen on Linwood Avenue near the Linwood Masjid. 49 people have been confirmed dead and more than 20 are injured following attacks at two mosques in Christchurch. Four people are in custody following shootings at Al Noor mosque on Dean's Road and the Linwood Masjid in Christchurch. Kai Schwoerer/Kai Schwoerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kai Schwoerer/Kai Schwoerer/Getty Images

CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND - MARCH 15: A floral tribute is seen on Linwood Avenue near the Linwood Masjid. 49 people have been confirmed dead and more than 20 are injured following attacks at two mosques in Christchurch. Four people are in custody following shootings at Al Noor mosque on Dean's Road and the Linwood Masjid in Christchurch.

Kai Schwoerer/Kai Schwoerer/Getty Images

A bloody massacre live-streamed to the world, filled with rhetoric from the darker corners of the Internet, moving too fast around the web to contain.

That is part of the legacy of Friday's mass shooting in New Zealand.

What can we do about that?

Police say the gunman is a white supremacist who posted a racist screed online, ten minutes before he opened fire. He live-streamed 17 minutes of the killings on Facebook Live, which was shared tens of millions of times on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and other platforms before being taken down. But the footage is still out there.

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern immediately condemned the massacre as a terrorist attack.

This appalling incident tells us a lot about online extremism — the role tech companies play in regulating or banning fringe users, and the role each of us plays in creating the online ecosystem where hate can thrive.

How do we reckon with online hate? What consequences should there be for the bigots who promote acts of violence?