Compaq Computers: Rod Canion In 1981, engineer Rod Canion left Texas Instruments and co-founded Compaq, which created the first IBM-compatible personal computer. This opened the door to an entire industry of PCs that could run the same software. PLUS for our postscript "How You Built That," we check back in with Danica Lause, who turned a knitting hobby into Peekaboos Ponytail Hats: knit caps with strategically placed holes for a ponytail or bun. (Original broadcast date: May 22, 2017).
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Compaq Computers: Rod Canion

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Compaq Computers: Rod Canion

Compaq Computers: Rod Canion

Compaq Computers: Rod Canion

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Andrew Holder for NPR
In 1981, engineer Rod Canion left Texas Instruments and co-founded Compaq, which created the first IBM-compatible personal computer. This opened the door to an entire industry of PCs that could run the same software.
Andrew Holder for NPR

In 1981, engineer Rod Canion left Texas Instruments and co-founded Compaq, which created the first IBM-compatible personal computer.

This opened the door to an entire industry of PCs that could run the same software.

How You Built That

We check back in with Danica Lause, who turned a knitting hobby into Peekaboos Ponytail Hats: knit caps with strategically placed holes for a ponytail or bun.

How You Built That: Peekaboos Ponytail Hats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705892242/705899008" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">