Predictions Our panelists predict, after MySpace, what will be the next social media scandal.
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Predictions

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Predictions

Predictions

Predictions

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Our panelists predict, after MySpace, what will be the next social media scandal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the next social media scandal? Adam Burke.

ADAM BURKE: A glitch will cause Instagram to turn off every filter on every picture, causing an entire generation to stare directly into the unvarnished face of reality.

(LAUGHTER)

BURKE: The sound of their screams will be deafening.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Sounds bad. Negin Farsad.

NEGIN FARSAD: Because of a malfunction, Tinder accidentally mixes up swiping right for swiping left, leaving a bunch of people to date who are actually good for one another.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And Mo Rocca.

MO ROCCA: It will be revealed that Friendster, the once mighty social network, is a communications tool for Quaker gangsters.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

CHIOKE I'ANSON: And if any of that happens, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

SAGAL: Thank you, Chioke I'Anson.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thanks also to Adam Burke, Negin Farsad and Mo Rocca. Thanks to all of you for listening. I'm Peter Sagal. We'll be back with you next week.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

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