1A Movie Club Sees 'Us' Ever had one of those moments when you just couldn't bear to see your own reflection? Hopefully, that reflection stayed in the mirror. Heaven forbid it should follow you, find you and — worse yet — try to replace you, by any means necessary.

Jordan Peele explores that side we hide in his latest thriller, "Us."

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1A Movie Club Sees 'Us'

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1A Movie Club Sees 'Us'

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1A Movie Club Sees 'Us'

1A Movie Club Sees 'Us'

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Jordan Peele, Lupita Nyong'o and Winston Duke at a screening of "Us" at Howard University. TASOS KATOPODIS/TASOS KATOPODIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR UNIVERSAL PICTURES hide caption

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TASOS KATOPODIS/TASOS KATOPODIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR UNIVERSAL PICTURES

Jordan Peele, Lupita Nyong'o and Winston Duke at a screening of "Us" at Howard University.

TASOS KATOPODIS/TASOS KATOPODIS/GETTY IMAGES FOR UNIVERSAL PICTURES

You might have seen "Get Out," which earned writer and director Jordan Peele his first Academy Award — for best original screenplay.

Now, he's back with another film that has left many shaking in their boots and shaking with laughter — sometimes simultaneously.

"Us" had a record-breaking opening at the box office, grossing more than $70 million to become the biggest opening for an original horror film and the third-largest horror film opening of all time.

Its impact extends well beyond the numbers.

We talked about what Peele's ambitious follow-up has to say about race, class and exclusion in America.