The Remote Control Brain What would it be like if you could control your mood with a hand held device? Literally turn the device to different settings and make yourself happier and sadder? Alix Spiegel talks to a woman who has that power. If you or somebody you know might need help, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7 at 1-800-273-8255 or at suicidepreventionlifeline.org.
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The Remote Control Brain

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The Remote Control Brain

The Remote Control Brain

The Remote Control Brain

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What would it be like if you could control your mood with a hand held device? Literally turn the device to different settings and make yourself happier and sadder? Alix Spiegel talks to a woman who has that power. She was part of a neuropsychiatric trial that implanted a device in her brain that was supposed to help moderate her severe OCD, which also allows her a different level of control over her mood than most of us.

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