A Therapist Goes To Therapy (And Gets A Taste Of Her Own Medicine) Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist who started seeing a therapist herself after the man she thought she would marry unexpectedly broke up with her. "I think that therapy at any age, it helps people to relate better to themselves and to the people around them," she says. "It helps them to examine the way that they live their lives and take responsibility for what's not working, and also for what they can change." Her new book is 'Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.'

Also, critic John Powers reviews the new PBS 'Masterpiece' series 'Mrs. Wilson.'
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A Therapist Goes To Therapy (And Gets A Taste Of Her Own Medicine)

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A Therapist Goes To Therapy (And Gets A Taste Of Her Own Medicine)

A Therapist Goes To Therapy (And Gets A Taste Of Her Own Medicine)

A Therapist Goes To Therapy (And Gets A Taste Of Her Own Medicine)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707652944/718363666" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist who started seeing a therapist herself after the man she thought she would marry unexpectedly broke up with her. "I think that therapy at any age, it helps people to relate better to themselves and to the people around them," she says. "It helps them to examine the way that they live their lives and take responsibility for what's not working, and also for what they can change." Her new book is 'Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.'

Also, critic John Powers reviews the new PBS 'Masterpiece' series 'Mrs. Wilson.'