Beware: Monday's News Stories May Not Be What They seem Because Monday was April Fool's Day, some news stories on the day after may be hard to trust. Does anyone really think former FBI chief James Comey is running for president, as he tweeted?
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Beware: Monday's News Stories May Not Be What They seem

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Beware: Monday's News Stories May Not Be What They seem

Beware: Monday's News Stories May Not Be What They seem

Beware: Monday's News Stories May Not Be What They seem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/708999629/708999630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Because Monday was April Fool's Day, some news stories on the day after may be hard to trust. Does anyone really think former FBI chief James Comey is running for president, as he tweeted?

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. This is when we bring you some absurd bit of human life. It's a tough day to fill this space because yesterday was April Fool's Day. So any news story that seems right for this space is also hard to trust. Who really thinks former FBI chief Jim Comey is running for president, as he tweeted yesterday? Then there's the alarm clock phone app that promises to wake you up with the sound of a vomiting dog. Although, when we checked, you really could download that app. It exists. It's MORNING EDITION.

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