Panel Questions Bike talk.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710465269/710633769" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Bike talk.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Tom, researchers in Australia were interested in making the roads safer for cyclists. As a result of their study, they have suggested that we ban what?

TOM BODETT: Spandex.

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: I'm just tossing out ideas here...

SAGAL: No, no.

BODETT: ...At this point. I need a hint.

SAGAL: Well, this is true. They're suggesting instead the phrase people who cycle.

BODETT: Oh, stop calling them cyclists.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

BODETT: Oh, because that's just, like, objectifying...

SAGAL: You have figured it out.

BODETT: Aha.

SAGAL: Yeah. There you are. That's exactly right. You may think cyclist is a neutral term like violinist or sexist. But...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...According to the authors of a study in the Journal of Traffic Psychology and Behavior, cyclist is a dehumanizing term like cockroach.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And it makes it easier for drivers to sideswipe them, feel aggressive, even throw things at them.

BODETT: It's like when people...

SAGAL: So instead, they are suggesting that instead of saying cyclist, we say people who cycle - as in, I threw a beer bottle at a person who cycles, and boy, was that satisfying.

(LAUGHTER)

ROXANNE ROBERTS: But wouldn't you have to say a person who drives threw a beer bottle at a person who cycles?

SAGAL: Yes.

PETER GROSZ: No. You'd have to say a person who drives threw a bottle that beers at a...

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: ...At a person who cycles.

SAGAL: Yes.

GROSZ: Yeah.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THE BIKE SONG")

MARK RONSON AND THE BUSINESS INTL: (Singing) Gonna ride my bike until I get home.

SAGAL: Coming up, if you think lying is annoying, wait until you hear this week's bluff game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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