Adam Serwer On White Nationalism's American Roots The Atlantic staff writer Adam Serwer explains how racism and white nationalism were deeply embedded in America not just from its founding, but throughout the 20th century — and how one man corralled those ideas into a grand pseudo-scientific theory that influenced U.S. immigration policy and eventually Nazi Germany. His article about that man, Madison Grant, is called "White Nationalism's Deep American Roots." Email the show at samsanders@npr.org
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Adam Serwer On White Nationalism's American Roots

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Adam Serwer On White Nationalism's American Roots

Adam Serwer On White Nationalism's American Roots

Adam Serwer On White Nationalism's American Roots

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The Atlantic staff writer Adam Serwer explains how racism and white nationalism were deeply embedded in America not just from its founding, but throughout the 20th century — and how one man corralled those ideas into a grand pseudo-scientific theory that influenced U.S. immigration policy and eventually Nazi Germany. His article about that man, Madison Grant, is called "White Nationalism's Deep American Roots." Email the show at samsanders@npr.org

Immigrants being sworn in as naturalized US citizens in 1929. A national immigration law passed five years earlier, in 1924, greatly reduced the number of non-white immigrants to the US. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Immigrants being sworn in as naturalized US citizens in 1929. A national immigration law passed five years earlier, in 1924, greatly reduced the number of non-white immigrants to the US.

Bettmann/Bettmann Archive