Bluff The Listener Our panelists read three stories about new prom trends, only one of which is true.
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Bluff The Listener

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Bluff The Listener

Bluff The Listener

Bluff The Listener

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Our panelists read three stories about new prom trends, only one of which is true.

BILL KURTIS: From NPR and WBEZ Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME, the NPR news quiz. I'm Bill Kurtis. We're playing this week with Negin Farsad, Alonzo Bodden and Maeve Higgins. And here again is your host at Trinity University's Laurie Auditorium in San Antonio, Peter Sagal.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, everybody. Thank you, Bill. Right now it is time for the WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME Bluff The Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play our game in the air.

Hi, you are on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

DEVIN O'DONNELL: Hi. This is Devin O'Donnell (ph) from Salt Lake City, Utah.

SAGAL: Salt Lake City is a beautiful place. What do you do there, Devin?

O'DONNELL: So I work at a warehouse during the day, go to cosmetology school at night. And I also work as a drag performer here in the city.

SAGAL: Oh. What - can I ask what your...

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: I have a number of questions.

O'DONNELL: (Laughter).

SAGAL: First of all, what is your drag name?

O'DONNELL: It's Gemma Nai (ph).

SAGAL: Gemma Nai. OK.

(CHEERING)

O'DONNELL: Yeah.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Sounds exotic. And - so when you're in cosmetology school - you're going to be a hairstylist?

O'DONNELL: Yeah, absolutely - hair and makeup.

SAGAL: That's fabulous. Well, as a drag queen, you will absolutely be ready to do that.

O'DONNELL: Yep, it's what got me started.

(CHEERING)

SAGAL: When you think about it...

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: ...You want your stylist to be a drag queen.

NEGIN FARSAD: Mmm hmm.

O'DONNELL: Really.

SAGAL: All right.

O'DONNELL: Who knows better how to do makeup than someone who beats their face weekly?

SAGAL: That's true.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Well, Devin, it's nice to have you with us. You're going to play our game in which you must try to tell truth from fiction. What is the topic, Bill?

KURTIS: America, will you go to prom with me?

SAGAL: It's prom season. And that means two things - one, photos your children will regret forever and two, new prom trends. Our panelists are going to tell you about what's new at prom this year. Pick the one who's telling the truth, you'll win our prize - the WAIT WAITer of your choice on your voicemail. You ready to play?

O'DONNELL: Absolutely.

SAGAL: All right. Let's hear first, then, from Negin Farsad.

FARSAD: The 1990s hip-hop duo Kris Kross made an unlikely resurgence at Boise, Idaho's Centennial High School. You might remember them from that one hit jump, jump. The Daddy Mac'll make you jump...

MAEVE HIGGINS: (Laughter).

FARSAD: ...Jump. Kris Kross will make you...

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: ...Jump, jump. The Daddy Mac'll make you jump, jump.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: I'm sure it was a huge hit with NPR audiences. Anyway...

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: ...You may also remember the curious fact that they wore their pants backwards. The kids at Centennial High could not get enough of Kris Kross and started dressing backwards on campus. While there were a few awkward adjustments at the boys urinal, school administrators viewed the whole thing as a passing throwback fad. But the trend continued to grow. And the senior class decided to make the theme of prom backward. So they renamed it morp (ph), which is prom backwards...

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: ...For those of you who lack backward-speaking facility. Not only did the students decide to dress backwards - long dress trains flowing forward on girls and corsages pinned on boys' backs - but they made everything backward. Morp night started with the after party, where students got exceedingly drunk and made mistakes they would soon regret for the rest of their lives.

(LAUGHTER)

FARSAD: As they danced through the night, they turned their moonwalks forward and their flossing upward. Their twerking had more chest and less booty. And their Gangnam style looked like a horse was riding them.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The backwards prom.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Where everything is backwards, including the progression of events in Boise. Your next promposal will come from Alonzo Bodden.

ALONZO BODDEN: Is your prom really chaperoned when the chaperone is Charlie Sheen?

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: You might have to figure that out, especially as the trend of celebrity prom chaperones is spreading and also because Mr. Sheen is looking for work.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: TMZ reporter Selena Jones (ph) says it started at Calabasas High School in Southern California. Now, Calabasas is well known as the home of the Kardashian family. One parent called in a favor from her friend Kris Jenner. And the next thing you know, Khloe Kardashian is at the prom, checking kids for alcohol. Not to be outdone, ICM super agent Ian Arougheti has a friend whose daughter is at Beverly Hills High School of the Arts. So now their prom will be monitored by Idris Elba.

HIGGINS: (Laughter).

BODDEN: Interestingly, there may be more mom volunteers than actual students at that.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: News travels fast and even faster on Snapchat. LA kids bragging got Nashville kids jealous. So their parents got into the act. And now country stars Carrie Underwood and Reba McEntire will be at the Nashville High School senior prom, making sure the kids don't do anything that they'll have to later write country songs about.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: Not to be outdone, New York started rumors of Jay-Z at a Brooklyn high school. But these were unfounded. So Brooklyn Tech will have to settle for Chris Rock.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: All of this led to the nightmare scenario possibly coming true. Charlie Sheen, through his lawyers, asked if chaperoning the LA performing arts high school prom would count as part of his community service.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: TMZ is waiting for the judge's decision.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Celebrity chaperones is the new trend.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Your last story of what's new under the sea comes from Maeve Higgins.

HIGGINS: This year's big prom trend is inspired by a texting fail. Teens across the country texted their dates to check what kind of corsage they wanted, only to find that their phones autocorrected the word corsage to croissant.

(LAUGHTER)

HIGGINS: Croissant. Seems like a rose by any other name is a pastry. Cheddar's Scratch Kitchen, a Dallas bakery, is now selling the croissant corsage after the quirky autocorrect mistake blew up on social media. So instead of wearing delicate carnations and pretty lilies, youngsters are getting their prom dates' corsages made from actual croissants. It's a lovely way to make memory and a grease stain that will last forever.

(LAUGHTER)

HIGGINS: Surely, this is just a first in a long line of carbohydrate accoutrements from - why is there so many French words?

(LAUGHTER)

HIGGINS: Surely, this is a first in a long line of carbohydrate accessories from bagel buttonholes, cupcake cufflinks and, of course, a cumber sticky bun.

(LAUGHTER)

HIGGINS: It's all part of a lovely trend of having some fun and providing gluten-intolerant people with yet another activity they can't participate in.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: All right. Which of these...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Is a real prom theme or trend this year? Was it from Negin, the backwards prom or morp, in which everything happens backwards; from Alonzo, celebrity chaperones, a famous person standing there at the door for you or from Maeve Higgins, kids wearing croissants instead of corsages because of an autocorrect failure? Which of these is the real story of a prom trend?

O'DONNELL: Well, I think I'm going to go with the croissant corsage.

SAGAL: You're going to go with the croissant crosage (ph). I can't even say it - the croissant - croissant corsage.

HIGGINS: Croissant corsage.

SAGAL: All right. Well, to bring you the correct answer, we spoke to someone playing a role in the real story.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN FELTON: They would be asking a prom dates what kind of corsage they wanted. And autocorrect on their phone would change that text to croissant.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: That was John Felton from Cheddar's Scratch Kitchen, which is making croissant corsages for this year's promgoers. Congratulations, Devin. You got it right.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

O'DONNELL: Yeah. Thank you.

SAGAL: You earned a point for Maeve for her...

HIGGINS: Thanks, Devin.

SAGAL: ...Pronunciation of croissant.

HIGGINS: (Laughter).

SAGAL: And you've won our prize, the voice of your choice on your voicemail. Thank you so much for playing with us.

O'DONNELL: Thank you. This was amazing.

(CHEERING, APPLAUSE)

HIGGINS: (Laughter).

SAGAL: Thank you, Devin.

(SOUNDBITE OF GRATEFUL DEAD'S "KING SOLOMON'S MARBLES")

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