American Airlines Flight Attendant Spills Drinks On Her Boss On a recent flight, someone bumped into flight attendant Maddie Peters. Her tray of drinks went airborne. Half directly onto Doug Parker's lap, who is the CEO of American Airlines.
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American Airlines Flight Attendant Spills Drinks On Her Boss

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American Airlines Flight Attendant Spills Drinks On Her Boss

American Airlines Flight Attendant Spills Drinks On Her Boss

American Airlines Flight Attendant Spills Drinks On Her Boss

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/713387938/713387939" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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On a recent flight, someone bumped into flight attendant Maddie Peters. Her tray of drinks went airborne. Half directly onto Doug Parker's lap, who is the CEO of American Airlines.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. You ever want to spill a drink on your boss? Yeah - me, neither. And it certainly wasn't Maddie Peters' plan. She's an American Airlines flight attendant. And on a recent flight, someone bumped her. Her tray of drinks went airborne, half of them directly onto Doug Parker's lap. Parker was a passenger. He's also American Airlines' CEO. Peters wrote on Instagram that her boss was a good sport about the whole thing and told her he would never forget her. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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