Can the Go-Go Go On? : Code Switch For more than two decades, a cellphone store in Washington, D.C. has blasted go-go music right outside of its front door. But a recent noise complaint from a resident of a new, upscale apartment building in the area brought the music to a halt — highlighting the tensions over gentrification in the nation's capital.
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Can the Go-Go Go On?

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Can the Go-Go Go On?

Can the Go-Go Go On?

Can the Go-Go Go On?

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For more than two decades, a cellphone store in Washington, D.C. has blasted go-go music right outside of its front door. But a recent noise complaint from a resident of a new, upscale apartment building in the area brought the music to a halt — highlighting the tensions over gentrification in the nation's capital.

Ryan-Camille Guyot holds a sign outside of the Metro PCS in protest after the store was forced to turn off it's Go-Go music due to noise complaints. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Ryan-Camille Guyot holds a sign outside of the Metro PCS in protest after the store was forced to turn off it's Go-Go music due to noise complaints.

The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images