Why One Nebraska Man Is Grateful For A Pothole That Went Unfilled Omaha, Nebras., has many potholes. One of them stopped a man's heart attack when the ambulance he was in hit it.
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Why One Nebraska Man Is Grateful For A Pothole That Went Unfilled

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Why One Nebraska Man Is Grateful For A Pothole That Went Unfilled

Why One Nebraska Man Is Grateful For A Pothole That Went Unfilled

Why One Nebraska Man Is Grateful For A Pothole That Went Unfilled

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Omaha, Nebras., has many potholes. One of them stopped a man's heart attack when the ambulance he was in hit it.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

You know the old saying. When life hands you potholes, make a defibrillator.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Yep, that's not a thing. But let's back up a little. Omaha, Neb., like much of the middle of the country, had a rough winter. It's had to patch a lot of potholes this year.

KELSEY STEWART: Just between March 29 and April 4, they repaired more than 7,000 potholes. And again last week, they repaired another 6,000. So it's kind of been - trying to keep up on top of it.

CHANG: Kelsey Stewart is a reporter with the Omaha World-Herald. She wrote about one pothole that was not patched.

CORNISH: And thank goodness.

CHANG: Yes, indeed. That's because that pothole may have remedied a medical emergency.

CORNISH: Here's the story. An ambulance from the town of Gretna outside of Omaha was en route to Lakeside Hospital.

STEWART: They transported a patient with a high heart rate to a hospital in Omaha. And when they hit that pothole, his heart rate went back down to normal.

CHANG: Stewart first read about the incident on Twitter and confirmed it with the Gretna fire chief. Like any good reporter would, she checked with a doctor on whether hitting a pothole could shock a heart rate back to normal.

STEWART: He said that this can happen although he had never heard of a pothole doing the trick. Folks with super ventricular tachycardia - they get a rapid heart rate that can be caused missed by a lot of things including a faulty electrical system in the heart, medication, stimulants. And then sometimes when patients with that condition are jolted or startled, their heart rates will return back to normal.

CHANG: A reply to the original tweet about the incident read...

CORNISH: Don't worry - city will bill them for that procedure.

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