How Grocery Shelves Get Stacked : Planet Money The pay-to-play way your supermarket's shelves work.
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How Grocery Shelves Get Stacked

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How Grocery Shelves Get Stacked

How Grocery Shelves Get Stacked

How Grocery Shelves Get Stacked

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There's a reason you always see the same candy and gum brands near the cash register at your favorite grocery store: the companies that make those products have paid big money for it to be there. That space nearest the checkout is called 'beachfront property' in the trade, and companies that want to see their products there pay for that space ... by the inch.

Something similar happens on almost every shelf in the store. The fees manufacturers pay for placement can be brutally high, and that can put smaller manufacturers out of business. It's a sore point in the industry, and it's attracted a lot of attention from regulators.

Today on The Indicator: the dark, cutthroat world of the grocery store.

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Sally Herships