And They Will Inherit It Almost 70 years ago, a group of majority Mexican-American miners in New Mexico readied themselves for a showdown with their bosses. The miners were going on strike to demand an end to discriminatory practices at the mines. The events inspired the 1954 film "Salt of the Earth"—made by filmmakers who had been blacklisted in Hollywood for supposed leftist sympathies. Latino USA heads to Grant County, New Mexico, to uncover the history of the The Empire Zinc Strike, to find out how a sleepy mining town erupted in protest and if almost 70 years later, anyone still remembers.
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And They Will Inherit It

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And They Will Inherit It

And They Will Inherit It

And They Will Inherit It

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/718794620/718823335" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Almost 70 years ago, a group of majority Mexican-American miners in New Mexico readied themselves for a showdown with their bosses. The miners were going on strike to demand an end to discriminatory practices at the mines. The events inspired the 1954 film "Salt of the Earth"—made by filmmakers who had been blacklisted in Hollywood for supposed leftist sympathies. Latino USA heads to Grant County, New Mexico, to uncover the history of the The Empire Zinc Strike, to find out how a sleepy mining town erupted in protest and if almost 70 years later, anyone still remembers.