You Say Chicano, I Say... : Code Switch When members of the nation's oldest Mexican-American student organization voted to change its name, it revealed generational tensions around the past, present, and future of the Chicano movement.
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You Say Chicano, I Say...

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You Say Chicano, I Say...

You Say Chicano, I Say...

You Say Chicano, I Say...

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When members of the nation's oldest Mexican-American student organization voted to change its name, it revealed generational tensions around the past, present, and future of the Chicano movement.

Chicano Park in San Diego. The park, built under a highway overpass, has become a symbol of the Chicano rights movement. It was built after residents of the surrounding Mexican-American neighborhood occupied the land in 1970 and demanded a park after officials reneged on promises to build one there. Adrian Florido/Adrian Florido hide caption

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Adrian Florido/Adrian Florido

Chicano Park in San Diego. The park, built under a highway overpass, has become a symbol of the Chicano rights movement. It was built after residents of the surrounding Mexican-American neighborhood occupied the land in 1970 and demanded a park after officials reneged on promises to build one there.

Adrian Florido/Adrian Florido