The Curious Ways We Find (And Lose) Our Way : 1A "A paper map requires you to locate yourself in real space, but with GPS on your phone, you're in your screen," Maura O'Connor told us.

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The Curious Ways We Find (And Lose) Our Way

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The Curious Ways We Find (And Lose) Our Way

1A

The Curious Ways We Find (And Lose) Our Way

The Curious Ways We Find (And Lose) Our Way

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Directions are shown on a GPS unit mounted in a car travelling along Kaiserdamm at dusk in Berlin. ODD ANDERSEN/ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ODD ANDERSEN/ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

Directions are shown on a GPS unit mounted in a car travelling along Kaiserdamm at dusk in Berlin.

ODD ANDERSEN/ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

It's hard to remember what life was like before GPS apps — when you couldn't just open Google maps or Waze and navigate to a place you'd never been without the anxiety of getting lost.

Our brains are incredible navigation computers. But have we become so dependent on navigation tools that, if left to our own devices, we'd all just be lost?

And when these technologies fail us, which they sometimes do, what can we gain from getting around on our own?