Episode 416: Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years : Planet Money For 70 years, the price of a bottle of Coca-Cola stayed a nickel. Why? The answer includes a half a million vending machines and a 7.5 cent coin.
NPR logo

Episode 416: Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/719213730/722258141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Episode 416: Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years

Episode 416: Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years

Episode 416: Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/719213730/722258141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Mike Fisher/Flickr
Coca-Cola
Mike Fisher/Flickr

Episode 416: Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/719213730/719228059" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

This episode originally ran in 2015.

Prices go up. Occasionally, prices go down. But for 70 years, the price of a bottle of Coca-Cola didn't change. From 1886 until the late 1950s, a bottle of coke cost just a nickel.

On today's show, we find out why. The answer includes a half a million vending machines, a 7.5 cent coin, and a company president who just wanted to get a couple of lawyers out of his office.

Music: "I'd Like To Buy the World a Coke" and "Always Coca Cola."

Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Instagram / Newsletter

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts and NPR One.