Man In Taiwan Swallows Wireless Earbud In His Sleep When Ben Hsu woke up, he only had one earbud. The Daily Mail reports he used a tracking feature to find his missing earbud. An x-ray confirmed it was inside of him. Doctors told him to wait it out.
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Man In Taiwan Swallows Wireless Earbud In His Sleep

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Man In Taiwan Swallows Wireless Earbud In His Sleep

Man In Taiwan Swallows Wireless Earbud In His Sleep

Man In Taiwan Swallows Wireless Earbud In His Sleep

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/720570701/720570702" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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When Ben Hsu woke up, he only had one earbud. The Daily Mail reports he used a tracking feature to find his missing earbud. An x-ray confirmed it was inside of him. Doctors told him to wait it out.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A man in Taiwan fell asleep wearing his wireless earbuds. When he woke up, one of them was missing. So, the Daily Mail reports, Ben Hsu used a tracking feature to look for it. His missing earbud then beeped. He followed the sound, and the sound followed him. The earbud was inside Hsu; he had swallowed it in his sleep. It showed up on an X-ray. Doctors told him to just wait it out; this, too, shall pass. When it did, Hsu told the Daily Mail it still worked. He called it magical. This is MORNING EDITION.

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