Subway's Five-Dollar Footlong Fail? : The Indicator from Planet Money Subway has more restaurants in the U.S. than any other fast food company. It did spectacularly well during the recession thanks, in part, to it's famous $5 footlong deal. But that deal has come back to haunt it.
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Subway's Five-Dollar Footlong Fail?

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Subway's Five-Dollar Footlong Fail?

Subway's Five-Dollar Footlong Fail?

Subway's Five-Dollar Footlong Fail?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721193879/730624104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
A Subway sandwich is seen in a restaurant as the company announced a settlement over a class-action lawsuit that alleged that Subway engaged in deceptive marketing for its 6-inch and 12-inch sandwiches and served customers less food than they were paying for on October 21, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Subway has nearly 25,000 restaurants in the U.S.--more than any other fast food company. Still, that's roughly 2000 fewer restaurants than it had a few years ago. Subway is in trouble. There are a number of reasons for the fast food retailer's woes, like over-expansion and competition from restaurants like Panera. But the biggest factor in the falter might be the very same thing that made Subway such a success during the economic downturn: the iconic five-dollar footlong sandwich.

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