After 6 Years In Local Paper's Classified Ads, Throne Finally Sells A man in Canada tried to sell a carved replica of a grand wooden chair. Over six years, he dropped the price from 5,000 to 1,000 Canadian dollars. At last a pub owner bought it, the CBC reports.
NPR logo

After 6 Years In Local Paper's Classified Ads, Throne Finally Sells

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/722739343/722739344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
After 6 Years In Local Paper's Classified Ads, Throne Finally Sells

After 6 Years In Local Paper's Classified Ads, Throne Finally Sells

After 6 Years In Local Paper's Classified Ads, Throne Finally Sells

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/722739343/722739344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man in Canada tried to sell a carved replica of a grand wooden chair. Over six years, he dropped the price from 5,000 to 1,000 Canadian dollars. At last a pub owner bought it, the CBC reports.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. We don't yet know how "Game Of Thrones" ends, but the saga of a Canadian throne is over. Larry Johnson tried to sell a carved replica of a grand wooden chair. He listed it in a paper, the Prince George Citizen, and kept advertising six years. The CBC reports the seller dropped his price from $5,000 to $1,000, and at last, a pub owner bought it. You, too, can sit in the throne if you're in the pub on your birthday. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.