Smell Forces Library At Australian University To Temporarily Evacuate The library at the University of Canberra sent out message saying the smell was from a durian fruit left in a garbage can — which apparently wasn't enough to contain the odor of the infamous fruit.
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Smell Forces Library At Australian University To Temporarily Evacuate

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Smell Forces Library At Australian University To Temporarily Evacuate

Smell Forces Library At Australian University To Temporarily Evacuate

Smell Forces Library At Australian University To Temporarily Evacuate

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/723134960/723134961" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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The library at the University of Canberra sent out message saying the smell was from a durian fruit left in a garbage can — which apparently wasn't enough to contain the odor of the infamous fruit.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. The University of Canberra in Australia had a temporary scare recently. This horrible smell was emanating from the library. Staff thought it might be a gas leak, so they evacuated immediately. An hour later, the school sent out a message saying it wasn't a gas leak after all; it was a durian fruit left in a garbage can, which was apparently not enough to contain the odor from this infamous fruit. Smithsonian magazine described it this way - turpentine and onions garnished with a gym sock. It's MORNING EDITION.

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