John Waters On Being A 'Filth Elder' The cult filmmaker, 73, has plenty of ideas about what older people should and shouldn't do. "You can't be trying too hard to rebel [when] you're older," Waters says. He talks about what he was like as a kid, why he's done making movies, and what he wants on his tombstone. His new book about his life in Hollywood is 'Mr. Know-It-All: The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder.'

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Spying On The South.'
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John Waters On Being A 'Filth Elder'

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John Waters On Being A 'Filth Elder'

John Waters On Being A 'Filth Elder'

John Waters On Being A 'Filth Elder'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/725068365/733409291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The cult filmmaker, 73, has plenty of ideas about what older people should and shouldn't do. "You can't be trying too hard to rebel [when] you're older," Waters says. He talks about what he was like as a kid, why he's done making movies, and what he wants on his tombstone. His new book about his life in Hollywood is 'Mr. Know-It-All: The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder.'

Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Spying On The South.'