The Nordic Paradox : Planet Money Norway is regarded as one of the most progressive nations in the world when it comes to encouraging female participation in the workforce. Yet the country still has relatively few female business leaders.
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The Nordic Paradox

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The Nordic Paradox

The Nordic Paradox

The Nordic Paradox

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/725478906/734743603" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Prime Minister of Norway Erna Solberg stands during a press conference with European Commission President on December 3, 2013 after a working session at the EU Headquarters in Brussels. GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

Prime Minister of Norway Erna Solberg stands during a press conference with European Commission President on December 3, 2013 after a working session at the EU Headquarters in Brussels.

GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

Norway has a solid reputation when it comes to gender equality. The country offers maternity leave and universal daycare; the prime minister is a woman and her cabinet members are mostly female; and Norway ranks high on international measures of gender equality. But when it comes to the private sector, Norway doesn't score so highly when it comes to gender parity in the workplace, especially at the top of the tree.

Today on The Indicator, we look at why are there so few female business leaders in Norway.

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