Panel Questions Monkey-in-Law.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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Monkey-in-Law.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

We want to remind everyone they can join us most weeks right here at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Ill. For tickets and more information, just go over to wbez.org. Or you can find a link at our website. That's waitwait.npr.org.

Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Faith, parenting is a full-time job for bonobo chimp mothers, who, we learned this week, are heavily involved in finding their sons what?

FAITH SALIE: Well, we know that bonobos are super randy...

SAGAL: That's true.

SALIE: ...Right? So I would think they're involved in finding their sons mates, right?

SAGAL: That's exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SALIE: So bonobos are also Jewish.

SAGAL: Apparently.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: They - yeah, they shortened the name from Bonobowitz (ph) when they made partner.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Bonobos, yes - bonobo moms aggressively help their sons find mates.

SALIE: (Laughter).

SAGAL: They chase away competition, lead their sons straight to potential partners and then explain to the female bonobos how wonderful their son is once you get to bo-know (ph) him.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Classic helicopter parents - so who else is going to be at the party? And are they ovulating?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And then - this is true - once the kids actually hook up with a fertile female, the mother will stand guard, since nothing enhances sexual performance...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: ...Like mom.

ALONZO BODDEN: So this behavior is actually more proof that we have descended...

SAGAL: Oh, yeah.

BODDEN: ...From...

SAGAL: From...

BODDEN: ...Chimps - I mean, this is...

SAGAL: Well, we have this common ancestor, and...

BODDEN: Human mothers do that all the time.

SAGAL: Absolutely.

BODDEN: That one's not good enough. My mother was more, like, take him off my hands.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Really?

BODDEN: But it never - no. She - my mother never got involved in who I would date. People would even ask her, like, does it bother you that he's not married or this or that? And she was, like, I don't have to live with him.

(LAUGHTER)

BODDEN: She's, like, I'm rid of him. I don't care who takes him from here.

(LAUGHTER)

TOM PAPA: Would you ever marry an aardvark?

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "JUNGLE LOVE")

THE TIME: (Singing) Oh, we, oh, we, oh - I think I wanna know ya, know ya. Oh, jungle love, yeah - oh, we, oh, we, oh. Girl, I'd love to show ya, show ya. Come on, baby - where's your guts? You want to make love or what? Oh, we, oh, we, oh. I want to...

SAGAL: Coming up, get out the Ambien. It's an insomniac Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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