Romance and Representation: 'Always Be My Maybe' And The Future Of The Raunch-Com : 1A "This story came from a real place for us. There were a lot of things about it that were authentic for us and we were the experts on getting that authenticity right," Randall Park told us.

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Romance and Representation: 'Always Be My Maybe' And The Future Of The Raunch-Com

Romance and Representation: 'Always Be My Maybe' And The Future Of The Raunch-Com

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WESTWOOD, CALIFORNIA - MAY 22: Randall Park, Ali Wong and Nahnatchka Khan attend the world premiere of Netflix's 'Always Be My Maybe' at Regency Village Theatre. EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES FOR NETFLIX hide caption

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EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES FOR NETFLIX

WESTWOOD, CALIFORNIA - MAY 22: Randall Park, Ali Wong and Nahnatchka Khan attend the world premiere of Netflix's 'Always Be My Maybe' at Regency Village Theatre.

EMMA MCINTYRE/GETTY IMAGES FOR NETFLIX

"Always Be My Maybe" has all the elements of a raunchy, screwball romantic comedy — except for its stars.

They are both Asian-American: comedian Ali Wong and actor Randall Park.

It's the third such rom-com in the last year, after "Crazy Rich Asians" and "To All the Boys I Loved Before."

What impact are movies like this having? And how did the creative team balance being culturally authentic, and just being funny?

We spoke with Park and Nahnatchka Khan about the film and the future of the rom-com genre.