All WeWork And No Play : Planet Money Co-working spaces might just be the future of work. Take WeWork. It's been cropping up in cities all over the world--borrowing billions to fuel its growth. Now, it's planning to go public.
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All WeWork And No Play

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All WeWork And No Play

All WeWork And No Play

All WeWork And No Play

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/729768929/738910722" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Co-working spaces like the ones created by the multi-billion dollar company, WeWork, have been dominating the real estate market. According to a report from JLL, over 30 percent of all office space will be considered "flexible" or spaces that offer short-term leases and co-working.

Spaces where workers either pay to set-up shop in a common area or shell out a monthly payment for a private office can either be distracting or inviting.

On today's episode, The Indicator went to a Manhattan WeWork to try to get some work done.

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