Returning To Paradise After The Fire : Planet Money The deadliest wildfire in California's history destroyed thousands of homes in Butte County. The area is still an active disaster zone. But insurance companies are making residents move back.
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Returning To Paradise

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Returning To Paradise

Returning To Paradise

Returning To Paradise

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Seven months ago, the California Camp Fire ravaged through Butte County destroying thousands of homes and ruining crucial infrastructure. Water is still unsafe to drink and toxic debris is still waiting to be taken away.

After the fire, people with insurance received stipends for living expenses from their provider. But if their homes have been cleaned up or rebuilt, insurance companies say they won't continue paying for accommodations.

Today on The Indicator, NPR National Correspondent Kirk Siegler shares his reporting from Paradise, California, and explains why residents have to return to their community, even if they don't want to.

A burned-out property sits next to a home that's still standing in the Paradise, Calif., area on April 23, 2019. Meredith Rizzo/NPR/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR/NPR

A burned-out property sits next to a home that's still standing in the Paradise, Calif., area on April 23, 2019.

Meredith Rizzo/NPR/NPR

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