Pizza Place In California Wants Patrons To Put Away Their Cellphones The Curry Pizza Company in Fresno wants people to stop texting, swiping and scrolling. They want patrons to talk to each other. If you get through the meal without your phone, you get a free pizza.
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Pizza Place In California Wants Patrons To Put Away Their Cellphones

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Pizza Place In California Wants Patrons To Put Away Their Cellphones

Pizza Place In California Wants Patrons To Put Away Their Cellphones

Pizza Place In California Wants Patrons To Put Away Their Cellphones

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/731196348/731196349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Curry Pizza Company in Fresno wants people to stop texting, swiping and scrolling. They want patrons to talk to each other. If you get through the meal without your phone, you get a free pizza.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A pizza place in California wants us to stop taking selfies during meals. Actually, they want us to stop texting, swiping, scrolling - all of it. And here's where it gets really crazy. Instead of looking at our phones, they want us to talk to each other. The Curry Pizza Company in Fresno wants any group of at least four people to lock away their cell phones when they come in. If you get through an entire meal, you get a free pizza - a triumph you will need to post about immediately. It's MORNING EDITION.

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