The Fourth Attacker: Episode 6 NPR 'White Lies' Civil Rights Crime Podcast In Episode 6, we reveal the identity of the fourth man who participated in the attack on the Rev. James Reeb.
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Learn Not To Hear It

Learn Not To Hear It

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A car passes by the vacant lot in modern-day Selma where the Silver Moon Cafe stood in 1965. The attack on the Rev. James Reeb occurred just outside the cafe. William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

A car passes by the vacant lot in modern-day Selma where the Silver Moon Cafe stood in 1965. The attack on the Rev. James Reeb occurred just outside the cafe.

William Widmer for NPR

Editor's note: This podcast contains explicit language that some may find offensive. In addition, the following description contains spoilers revealed in Episode 6 of White Lies.

In Episode 6, we find the fourth man involved in the attack of the Rev. James Reeb, unearthing new facts in this civil rights-era cold case.

Three men, Elmer Cook, Stanley Hoggle and Namon "Duck" O'Neal Hoggle, were tried for and acquitted of Reeb's murder, but NPR's reporting has now revealed a fourth man, identified first by a key eyewitness to the assault, who was never brought to justice.

At the time of our reporting, that man, William Portwood, was alive and living in Selma, Ala., where the Reeb attack happened. In this episode, we hear from Portwood himself.

The FBI investigated Portwood at the time, records show, but he was never charged. Portwood confirmed to NPR, however, that he did participate in the attack, along with Cook and the Hoggles, who have all since died.

To explore photos, research and evidence behind NPR's investigation into the murder of Reeb, visit npr.org/whitelies.