Elaine Welteroth On Transforming Teen Vogue And Knowing Your Worth "Our job was to reflect this next generation of young people," Welteroth told us.

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Elaine Welteroth On Transforming Teen Vogue And Knowing Your Worth

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Elaine Welteroth On Transforming Teen Vogue And Knowing Your Worth

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Elaine Welteroth On Transforming Teen Vogue And Knowing Your Worth

Elaine Welteroth On Transforming Teen Vogue And Knowing Your Worth

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733737360/733769477" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Elaine Welteroth's new book is called "More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say)." Courtesy of Penguin Publishing Group hide caption

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Courtesy of Penguin Publishing Group

Elaine Welteroth's new book is called "More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say)."

Courtesy of Penguin Publishing Group

If you think of Teen Vogue or any fashion magazine targeted at teenage girls, you probably think of lots of splashy colors, advice on what to wear on the first day back to school or how to snag that crush.

But in the past few years, Teen Vogue has sounded less like a publication for teenagers obsessed with trends.

The magazine published the video "These Nine Young People Have some Words for Donald Trump" on their YouTube channel the day after President Trump was elected in November 2016.

From articles on migrant justice and climate change, to how social media's being used to talk about protests and political violence in Sudan, Teen Vogue has dramatically changed its beat.

You can thank Elaine Welteroth for that. She is the former editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue. Welteroth was the youngest editor in the history of Condé Nast and the second African American to hold this position. She is now a judge on Bravo's competitive fashion show "Project Runway." Her new memoir is More Than Enough: Claiming Space for Who You Are (No Matter What They Say).

We spoke with Welteroth about summoning our inner boss and what she learned after leaving media.