Japan's Inflation Gamble : Planet Money Japan is still recovering from a brutal recession that lasted ten years. The country has tried a variety of fiscal and monetary measures to bring its economy back.
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Japan's Inflation Gamble

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Japan's Inflation Gamble

Japan's Inflation Gamble

Japan's Inflation Gamble

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/733800857/743483216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bank of Japan governor Haruhiko Kuroda points at a journalist to ask a question during a press conference in Tokyo on July 20, 2017. BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

Bank of Japan governor Haruhiko Kuroda points at a journalist to ask a question during a press conference in Tokyo on July 20, 2017.

BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images

In the 1980s, the Japanese economy looked unstoppable. But come the 90s, everything changed. The stock index took a hit, falling nearly 40 percent in 1990 alone. Commercial real estate prices followed. Retail prices began to slide and when it became clear that asset prices weren't going to recover soon, people stopped spending. Japan's economy ground to a halt.

Now, the governor of Japan's central bank is on a mission to restore Japan's economy. His top priority is to bring inflation back to two percent, the standard metric of a healthy economy. Today on The Indicator, we look at what tactics Japan's central bank has been trying to do that, and whether they've worked.

Thanks to Katherine Whatley who contributed reporting from Japan.

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