Women's Soccer Sues For Equal Pay : Planet Money The U.S. women's soccer team is way more successful than the men's. Yet they say they get paid less than half, on average, compared to the men's team.
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Women's Soccer Sues For Equal Pay

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Women's Soccer Sues For Equal Pay

Women's Soccer Sues For Equal Pay

Women's Soccer Sues For Equal Pay

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/734901705/734907270" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Brandi Chastain after scoring the game-winning goal in the penalty shootout in the 1999 World Cup Final. Mike Blake/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters

Brandi Chastain after scoring the game-winning goal in the penalty shootout in the 1999 World Cup Final.

Mike Blake/Reuters

The U.S. women's soccer team is the favorite to with this year's Women's World Cup. The men's team, on the other hand, didn't even make it to the tournament in Russia last year.

Since 1999, when Brandi Chastain caused a stir in the Women's World Cup by tearing off her shirt in celebration of a win against China, the U.S. women's team has gotten better and better. The men, on the other hand, have tended to disappoint.

And yet, the men who play soccer for the USA get paid more than twice what the women do, according to a lawsuit filed by a group of female players. On today's Indicator, we explore soccer's gender pay gap: why it exists, why it persists, and what might make things change.

Music by Drop Electric.

Additional music:"All I Do Is Win"

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