Panel Questions Snore-mageddon.
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Panel Questions

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Panel Questions

Panel Questions

Panel Questions

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  • Transcript

Snore-mageddon.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Peter, more and more people are using sleep trackers - wearable gadgets that give you data to help you improve your sleep. But according to a new study, these sleep trackers can also cause what?

PETER GROSZ: Anxiety and insomnia.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: You say irony. They say business model.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: The devices monitor your heart rate, your restlessness where you roll around, your REM cycle. And they give you a sleep score. Basically, they have gamified sleep. But new research shows people are so anxious about getting a good sleep score that it keeps them up at night.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know how it goes. You don't get a good sleep score, you won't get into a good sleep school.

(LAUGHTER)

ADAM FELBER: And your parents will have to Photoshop your face onto a sleeping person.

SAGAL: I know.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You know - do you know how people - like, I don't know why they do this, but to cheat their step counter, they'd sometimes, like...

GROSZ: Yeah.

SAGAL: ...Attach it to their dog, for example...

GROSZ: We...

SAGAL: Yes.

GROSZ: I learned that from you, Peter, like a year ago.

SAGAL: I mean...

FELBER: (Laughter).

SAGAL: What would be the sleep tracker equivalent - like, attaching it to a corpse?

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: No, it would be - the steps is for a dog, and the sleep is for a cat.

SAGAL: Exactly, yeah.

ROXANNE ROBERTS: Does a sleep tracker customize it? Or does it tell you what you're supposed to do?

GROSZ: It just gives you the raw data, you're asking? Or is...

SAGAL: Yeah. I think what it does - because my phone does this without me asking it. It says, you haven't been getting enough sleep. It sort of lectures you. You should get more sleep.

FELBER: Your phone does this?

SAGAL: Yeah.

GROSZ: Do you turn your phone off when you sleep?

SAGAL: Well, I've got this thing - it's, like, it tells me, time for bed.

GROSZ: And then you go to bed?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yeah.

GROSZ: So hold on a second.

FELBER: Wait a minute.

GROSZ: You know that's...

(LAUGHTER)

GROSZ: ...A suggestion.

SAGAL: I'm not going to say no to my phone.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Why would you install such a...

SAGAL: It's my best friend.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: Oh, my God.

GROSZ: You're not 5, and it's your parents.

ROBERTS: That's why you have skull spurs.

SAGAL: I know.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That's the problem. And the other problem is I can't sleep because I keep lying on my skull bone.

(SOUNDBITE OF ROCKABYE BABY!'S "YOU SHOOK ME ALL NIGHT LONG")

SAGAL: Coming up, our panelists have lots of excuses in our Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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