The Protest Tipping Point : Planet Money If you're considering a popular uprising against a government, it turns out there may be a recipe that can almost guarantee your success.
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The Protest Tipping Point

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The Protest Tipping Point

The Protest Tipping Point

The Protest Tipping Point

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Millions of people recently took to the streets of Hong Kong, protesting an extradition bill that they say could erode their freedoms and tighten China's grip on the territory. How likely are they to get what they want?

It turns out there may be a way to predict the success of the protest, and other popular uprisings around the world. Erica Chenoweth, a professor of public policy at Harvard, teamed up with non-violence researcher Maria Stephan to crunch the data on political protests, and they found that there is an almost foolproof recipe for a successful revolution.

Today on The Indicator, Darian Woods joins Stacey Vanek Smith to talk about how to make a revolution work.

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