Would You Live In A Home Where Something Grisly Happened, Survey Asks More than half of Hong Kong respondents said yes. A Prudential Brokerage official told the South China Morning Post that some people are afraid of ghosts but more are afraid of sleeping on the street.
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Would You Live In A Home Where Something Grisly Happened, Survey Asks

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Would You Live In A Home Where Something Grisly Happened, Survey Asks

Would You Live In A Home Where Something Grisly Happened, Survey Asks

Would You Live In A Home Where Something Grisly Happened, Survey Asks

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More than half of Hong Kong respondents said yes. A Prudential Brokerage official told the South China Morning Post that some people are afraid of ghosts but more are afraid of sleeping on the street.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. We all know the sacrifices people will make to buy a home. A rental website in Hong Kong decided to ask how far they'd go. Would people consider living in a home where something grisly like a murder or suicide happened if it meant paying less? More than half said yes. Alvin Cheung of Prudential Brokerage told the South China Morning Post, a lot of people are afraid of ghosts, but they're more afraid of sleeping on the street.

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