Episode 923: Good Teachers, Bad Deal : Planet Money Teachers made a deal with the Department of Education. They kept their end of the bargain. Why didn't the government?
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Episode 923: Good Teachers, Bad Deal

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Episode 923: Good Teachers, Bad Deal

Episode 923: Good Teachers, Bad Deal

Episode 923: Good Teachers, Bad Deal

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/737082238/737167870" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kaitlyn McCollum at Columbia Central High School in Tennessee. Stacy Kranitz/NPR hide caption

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Stacy Kranitz/NPR

Kaitlyn McCollum at Columbia Central High School in Tennessee.

Stacy Kranitz/NPR

A Department of Education program gives talented, up-and-coming teachers a grant, not a loan, to help them pay for college. The condition: After you graduate, you have to teach in a low-income school.

Thousands of teachers kept their end of that bargain but had their grants turned to loans anyway after sending in a required form a day late or accidentally missing a signature. Some are in crippling debt because of it.

Two NPR reporters spent a year and a half getting to the heart of this bureaucratic nightmare. Today on the show, we learn what they found, and how it changed a department.

Music: "Making Big Plans" and "Sunburn."

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