Jason Rezaian and George Takei On Two Forms Of Imprisonment "As Iranians in this country, we've suffered a lot of backlash since the 1970s," Rezaian told us. "That continues to this day. As I've watched the crisis at the border, I worry that we're descending into similar situations that my father and George dealt with."

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Jason Rezaian and George Takei On Two Forms Of Imprisonment

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Jason Rezaian and George Takei On Two Forms Of Imprisonment

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Jason Rezaian and George Takei On Two Forms Of Imprisonment

Jason Rezaian and George Takei On Two Forms Of Imprisonment

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/737662452/737745921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jason Rezaian | George Takei BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES | CHRISTOPHER POLK/GETTY IMAGES hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES | CHRISTOPHER POLK/GETTY IMAGES

Jason Rezaian | George Takei

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/GETTY IMAGES | CHRISTOPHER POLK/GETTY IMAGES

Jason Rezaian, a journalist and the former Washington Post Tehran bureau chief, has some deep thoughts on President Trump's foreign policy strategy toward Iran.

Rezaian is Iranian-American. He reported there. And he spent 554 days imprisoned in Iran's Evin prison on charges of espionage.

So, what's on his mind now with tensions rising between the U.S. and Iran? He told us his proposal for the way forward.

Jason and our second guest, George Takei, have something in common they probably wish they didn't: imprisonment. Their stories are very different, but they have common threads: memory, identity, human worth. We spent a bit of time teasing out those ideas.

Then, we zeroed on in George's new graphic memoir, They Called Us Enemy, which details his imprisonment at a Japanese-American internment camp as a child. Those early experiences have informed his rhetoric and reaction to the migrant crisis at the Southern border.