Amazon Fails & Tries To Grow Stronger : Planet Money One of the largest companies in the world, Amazon, just shuttered its food delivery service, Amazon Restaurants. But Amazon's fails are a bit different.
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Amazon #FAIL...?

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Amazon #FAIL...?

Amazon #FAIL...?

Amazon #FAIL...?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/737736397/737746181" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
Dave Limp, Senior Vice President of Amazon Devices, intoduces the "amazonbasics microwave," which can be controlled by an Alexa, at the Amazon Spheres.(Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

The online food delivery industry has managed to solve an issue that has managed to stifle online retailers-- the so-called "last-mile"delivery. But the companies that can pull it off and turn a profit, tend to be local.

The logistical challenge of the last mile is, in part, why Amazon's food delivery service, Amazon Restaurants, just failed. Companies like Seamless, Postmates, and Grubhub have the advantage of being small and local. Still, Amazon has taken note, and might come back, stronger than ever.

Today on the Indicator, how Amazon tries to maximize on its failures and what that means for online food delivery industry.

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