Mets Honor Deceased World Series Winners But Some Are Still Alive There was a photo montage of players who had died since the 1969 Miracle Mets won the World Series that year. It included outfielder Jim Gosger and pitcher Jesse Hudson, who are still alive.
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Mets Honor Deceased World Series Winners But Some Are Still Alive

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Mets Honor Deceased World Series Winners But Some Are Still Alive

Mets Honor Deceased World Series Winners But Some Are Still Alive

Mets Honor Deceased World Series Winners But Some Are Still Alive

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There was a photo montage of players who had died since the 1969 Miracle Mets won the World Series that year. It included outfielder Jim Gosger and pitcher Jesse Hudson, who are still alive.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. On Saturday, before the New York Mets took on Atlanta, there was a ceremony to honor the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Miracle Mets, who won the World Series that year. There was a lovely montage showing photos of players who had passed away, including Gil Hodges and Tug McGraw. Problem was it also included outfielder Jim Gosger and pitcher Jesse Hudson, who are still very much alive. Mets officials apologized, but the whole thing put bad juju into Mets world, and they lost the game 5-4.[POST BROADCAST CORRECTION: We incorrectly refer to Gil Hodges as one of the players on the 1969 team who have since died. Hodges was the team's manager.]

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Correction July 2, 2019

We incorrectly refer to Gil Hodges as one of the players on the 1969 team who have since died. Hodges was the team's manager.