How The US Uses Its Land : Planet Money The U.S. is a big place, nearly 1.9 billion acres. On today's Indicator, we look at how all that land is divvied up.
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The Cows Are Taking All The Land

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The Cows Are Taking All The Land

The Cows Are Taking All The Land

The Cows Are Taking All The Land

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Almost 1.9 billion acres. Roughly 2.9 million square miles. That's how big the continental United States of America is, not including Alaska and Hawai'i. But how is all that land divided up? Lauren Leatherby is a data journalist at Bloomberg News, who crunched a bunch of data from the Department of Agriculture and came up with some interesting facts about how America uses its land. We asked her about it, and realized that when it comes to land use, America looks a lot like...McDonalds.

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