Passenger's Layered Look Prompts Airline Security Questions A man was traveling from France back to Scotland when he was told his suitcase was 17 pounds overweight. He didn't want to pay a fee so he put on more clothes. His layers got security's attention.
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Passenger's Layered Look Prompts Airline Security Questions

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Passenger's Layered Look Prompts Airline Security Questions

Passenger's Layered Look Prompts Airline Security Questions

Passenger's Layered Look Prompts Airline Security Questions

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/739416323/739416324" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A man was traveling from France back to Scotland when he was told his suitcase was 17 pounds overweight. He didn't want to pay a fee so he put on more clothes. His layers got security's attention.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. A guy named John Irvine was traveling from France back home to Scotland. When he checked in at the airport, though, he was told his suitcase was 17 pounds overweight. Irvine refused to pay the fines for the heavy bag so he took out a bunch of stuff and just started layering - putting about 15 shirts on top of what he was already wearing. No doubt, Irvine was feeling pretty proud of himself, until moments later when he tried to take his layered look through security.

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