1A Across America: Migrant Aid Divides Congregations "We have to be humanitarian to each other first before we can do humanitarian work at the border," Minister Alyssa Stebbing said of her approach to keeping the peace in her congregation. "It's hard work, but it's necessary."

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1A Across America: Migrant Aid Divides Congregations

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1A Across America: Migrant Aid Divides Congregations

1A

1A Across America: Migrant Aid Divides Congregations

1A Across America: Migrant Aid Divides Congregations

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Sister Norma Pimentel is the director of Catholic Charities for the Rio Grande Valley. The respite center has aided 100,000 migrants since it opened in 2014. JAMES MORRISON/WAMU hide caption

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JAMES MORRISON/WAMU

Sister Norma Pimentel is the director of Catholic Charities for the Rio Grande Valley. The respite center has aided 100,000 migrants since it opened in 2014.

JAMES MORRISON/WAMU

The Bible is clear: Hospitality is every believer's responsibility. One verse says you may be helping an angel when you help a stranger.

So it's easy to see why some faith organizations feel compelled to render humanitarian aid along the Southern border. Customs and Border Protection often delivers migrants to faith-based shelters directly from detention centers. Volunteers provide food, shelter, clothing and travel assistance, often in official partnerships with government agencies at all levels.

But the cost of this help is not just financial. It's creating political fault lines within liberal and conservative churches, including among white evangelical voters who helped elect Donald Trump president.

Some say their churches are enabling illegal immigration, and that aiding migrants is inherently political.

Others say this is a strictly moral issue — nothing to do with politics — but it's making people of faith pay for the Administration's failings.

As part of our project Across America, we tagged along with volunteers from an Episcopal church in Houston as they headed to McAllen, Texas, a few miles from the border.