Game Mode: Consoles And Community "When I first played 'World of Warcraft,' there was something really wild about hearing all these people from around the world. Now, it's something that the industry has taken and run with," said Ion Hazzikostas, game director for 'World of Warcraft.'

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Game Mode: Consoles And Community

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Game Mode: Consoles And Community

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Game Mode: Consoles And Community

Game Mode: Consoles And Community

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Cosplayers pose at gaming convention E3. PAIGE OSBURN/WAMU hide caption

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PAIGE OSBURN/WAMU

Cosplayers pose at gaming convention E3.

PAIGE OSBURN/WAMU

The stereotype of playing video games is that it's anti-social: a way to disconnect from the real world and other people. That stereotype was unfair from the beginning, and it's even less true today.

Today, there are more ways than ever to connect over a game — both in-game, and in so-called "real life."

Today, we started a special series exploring the issues surrounding video games, and modern gaming. We're calling it Game Mode.

Throughout the week, we'll bring you industry experts, developers, creators and of course, players.

We began with a look at the gaming community: the gamers who've come to mean something to one another as players, and as people.