Fresh Air Weekend: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum; Satirist Randy Rainbow Nussbaum reflects on the TV revolution in her book, I Like to Watch. Maureen Corrigan reviews Alexi Zentner's new novel, Copperhead. Rainbow uses show tunes and pop songs to lampoon Trump.
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Fresh Air Weekend: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum; Satirist Randy Rainbow

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Fresh Air Weekend: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum; Satirist Randy Rainbow

Fresh Air Weekend: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum; Satirist Randy Rainbow

Fresh Air Weekend: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum; Satirist Randy Rainbow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/743455420/743785130" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Emily Nussbaum received the most hate mail of her career after she panned season 1 of HBO's True Detective. "Most of it was handwritten," she says. C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House hide caption

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C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House

Emily Nussbaum received the most hate mail of her career after she panned season 1 of HBO's True Detective. "Most of it was handwritten," she says.

C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

We All Watch In Our Own Way: A Critic Tracks The 'TV Revolution': New Yorker TV critic Emily Nussbaum won't appear on panels pitting TV against movies or books. "Everything is valuable in its own way and they don't need to be in tension with one another," she says.

Smart And Propulsive 'Copperhead' Asks: Can You Outrun Your Family's Sins?: Alexi Zentner's new novel follows a high school football star's efforts to separate himself from his racist family. It's an unsparing story about race, class and the limits of individual possibility.

Satirist Randy Rainbow Uses Show Tunes And Pop Songs To Lampoon Trump: "I always considered song parody kind of cheap," the Emmy-nominated lyricist and performer says. "But ... I've gotten [such a] response from others ... that I'm appreciating it as an art form."

You can listen to the original interviews here:

We All Watch In Our Own Way: A Critic Tracks The 'TV Revolution'

Smart And Propulsive 'Copperhead' Asks: Can You Outrun Your Family's Sins?

Satirist Randy Rainbow Uses Show Tunes And Pop Songs To Lampoon Trump