Rhino Bonds : Planet Money Investors will soon be able to bet on black rhinos. A conservation group is rolling out a 5 year, 50 million dollar rhino bond to help save the species.
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Rhino Bonds

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Rhino Bonds

Rhino Bonds

Rhino Bonds

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Frans Lanting /DPA/Landov
A black rhino in Namibia's Etosha National Park.
Frans Lanting /DPA/Landov

The horn of a rhinoceros can go for more than $100,000 on the black market. The powder from the horn is used in hangover cures and as an alternative cancer treatment. The full rhino horn is also sometimes seen as a status symbol for wealthy people.

For poachers, the rhino is a walking gold mine. As a result of this and disappearing habitat, there are only about 5,500 black rhinos left on the planet. By comparison, in 1970 there were about 70,000. But bringing those numbers back means protecting rhinos from poachers. And that takes a lot of knowledge, manpower and money.

Today on The Indicator, how the financial market is being used to save a dying species: The "Rhino Bond."

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