What If Workers Sat On Corporate Boards? : Planet Money The board of directors for most U.S. companies is made up of shareholders--not workers. A corporate system called co-determination aims to put employees at the table where big decisions are made.
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What If Workers Sat On Corporate Boards?

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What If Workers Sat On Corporate Boards?

What If Workers Sat On Corporate Boards?

What If Workers Sat On Corporate Boards?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/747044058/747064027" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Elizabeth Warren has pitched a new idea. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In the U.S., a company's board of directors is typically made up of people elected by shareholders — they represent shareholder interests, AKA maximizing profits. But in parts of Europe, the law mandates companies have a mix of workers and owners on their boards, so workers have a voice in the big decisions a company makes. It's called co-determination and now some Democratic presidential hopefuls, including Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are pitching it as a plan for U.S. companies.

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